2020 CR-V Hybrid

About 10 years after it should have been released…

https://hondanews.com/en-US/honda-automobiles/releases/release-f14e4d95353ee177f9926a59c700267f-2020-honda-cr-v-americas-most-popular-cuv-gets-new-us-built-hybrid-electric-version-standard-honda-sensing-and-freshened-styling

I really like the exterior refresh. Looks much less frumpy than the current one.

Peak total system horsepower is 212, up from 190 HP on the CR-V, along with an anticipated 50 percent increase in the EPA city fuel economy rating compared to the CR-V.

That would put it at 42mpg city

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How much do we reckon the dealer mark up will be on the first batch? Given how Toyota can’t make the RAV4 Hybrid fast enough and i’d argue the CR-V is a (very slightly) better vehicle.

I’m looking forward to seeing what Mazda is going to introduce with their first EV/PHEV. 140hp, I assume it’s going to be something small like a 3 or CX3. Shame it’s not the CX5 as that’d be a great CUV pick.

Paging @HondaSoCal.

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I am at the ER now guys. I have had an erection for 5+ hours from when this article came out. I hope to have more information for all you mooches tomorrow!

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You take care! a priapism can be very painful, not just hilarious.

You should see the ailments all the California middle class soccer moms went to the ER with when they heard about this being announced!

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There are so many disappointed soccer moms who didn’t hold out and bought the hybrid honda jr aka Rav4 Hybrid. hashtag shots fired at cody

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Many suggest natural remedies, like looking at a photo of Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

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The doctor actually told me it was due to being a born-again virgin against my will. Being a 400lb used car salesman certainly takes a toll on your body.

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My wife was really excited about this one. The actual numbers haven’t been released, but many are estimating 43mpg combined and a Hybrid upcharge of $1800. I was doing some quick math based on today’s fuel price, the standard 1.5 engine (Real World) combined 29mpg, and taking into consideration a .25% interest savings on the loan (buying a Fuel efficient) vehicle. We would have to drive to exactly 62,971 miles to break even. At a 100k miles, we would have only saved around $1100, not taking into account (and likely) extra depreciation. I really like what they have done with this mid-cycle refresh, but now that they have added “Honda Sense” and the 1.5 mil across the board, the base LX non-Hybrid is probably the way to go.

Part you are missing is that the dealers will charge way more for a hybrid. So after discounts on the gas model it will hard to even break even.

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Actually doing those kinds of calculations won’t matter to most people though. Some are enamored with the high MPG without even considering that they won’t ever see a financial benefit.

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The break even point of a hybrid depends on your driving style. All city driving will see a much faster return. All highway driving will likely never see a return.

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I’m more curious on how the 2.0l engine responds. The 1.5l on my ‘19 Touring is annoyingly loud and appears to be struggling under acceleration. I’m not looking for better performance, I understand that, but less noise would be appreciated.

The other updates are nice, except for the front bumper that stands out like a chin strap.

I do mostly city driving and I average 20mpg.

Very good points, I guess if you don’t like money, “Get a Hybrid”. Knowing that and my wife, were getting a “Hybrid”.

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Wow! That’s really horrendous. Almost as bad as our 05 Odyssey :rofl: In that type of driving you should see a 50-100% increase in fuel economy.

Most hybrid buyers just want their friends to see one of these.

You can virtue signal with any vehicle for $12.99 or less.

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It really is, I don’t get it. Especially when my 300hp ‘12 MDX averaged just 2-3mpg less. However, I am saving with reg. vs prem. gas.

Can’t speak to CR-V Hybrid because I haven’t driven one, but the hybrid version of RAV4 improves acceleration, range, and NVH over the standard version, so it’s not just about saving money and reducing pollution.

Also with Toyota hybrids, you’ll likely get back a portion of the upfront premium when you sell the car. They’re still in demand on the used car market due to lower operating costs (longer OCI, less frequent brake pad replacement, cheaper to fuel, etc.)

You should see the treatment for it…

This CR-V will sell incredibly well, but I’m wondering why Honda felt the need to put a weird Mercede or BMW-like metallic trim on the front air dam? It looks… weird.

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